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CSPAN
Jul 3, 2011 3:00pm EDT
is an open minded scholar. who embraces big ideas who's not encapsulated by silos or artificial boundaries. he's clarifies as he pursues nuance and complexity. don't be fooled by the fact that this book and after the cohen says from prehistoric times to the french revolution. professor fukuyama takes you through the state, counter, and government, and what's the origin. having one of those in place doesn't suppose that the others will have vibrant and alive institutions. he discusses failed and failing states, provides probing questions ab the -- about the united states as well. i love the fact that you defend the necessity of politics even as you take us through political anxiety and political decay and it makes us think about our own society here in the united states. i have not read the whole book yet. but i've already been made to think for me unreconstructed and open-minded liberal you helped me realize there's more than friedrich hayek that market absolutism. let us welcome francis fukuyama and -- [applause] [applause] >> let's also pay tribute to the good work of c-span which adds t
CSPAN
Jul 30, 2011 11:00am EDT
stunned to not see every single hand in the room go up. okay. two big thumbs up for the verge of selfishness. fantastic. if you have not read alice shrek in no way i envy you because you have before you a fantastic. the first reading is a transformer and experience. in poll after poll what americans are asked, what is the book that influences you the most. alice shrek is always in the top two or three. the town had. always in the top two or three. i have to tell you, there is a message in that that we libertarians, individualists, one of the curses is we tend to sometimes think that we are alone. i can tell you i certainly feel that way. i live in northern california where a libertarian can feel very, very alone. i live just south of san francisco, not literally in nazi policies congressional district, but i can smell it from our live. i can tell you, i feel very alone. it is fantastic to be here as freedom fest. it is great to see that there are like-minded people. they just don't have to live in my zip code. so written 54 years ago, probably the best selling book in the engl
CSPAN
Jul 23, 2011 10:00am EDT
are going to be the same. you're going to have some neighborhoods that have large houses and big lots. that's okay. and you're going to have other parts that have apartment complexes and duplexes, that's okay too. but there's some things we should all have in common in all of our neighborhoods. they should be places where children can grow up safely, where they feel comfortable walking next door, going down to see their friend down the street, where the infrastructure look okay, it's the streets and the sidewalks, they look okay, where there are not drug dealers and prostitutes down the street. that's not how you and i would want to live, have our children grow up, and we should -- i know we don't want any of our children to have to grow up in places like that. they should have a grocery store down the street and a bank and a library. they should have, generally, the amenities that all of us have, and every child should have at least the opportunity, there's no guarantee of results in america, but the they should have opportunities to grow up in a place and be able to believe in the same dr
CSPAN
Jul 31, 2011 12:40am EDT
if you are a big physics and i will take you there sometime if you come to l.a.. jon nash by contrast when the nobel prize in economics for his work on game theory. discovered discover the mathematical relationship between subjects in a contest of any kind might be a prisoner's dilemma in a contest or an ultimatum game or it could even be corporations in a particular industry or nations competing in a cold war strategy. nash equilibrium is a famous theory about how subjects reach a stable state of how they compete with one another, whether it is companies in a particular industry. they are very competitive and end up reaching a stabilize stabilize.where prices stabilize and the quality of product stabilized for a while. cold war strategies like mutual assured destruction is the type of nash equilibrium where we reach a stable state for a while. i'm not going to gain anything by changing my strategy and neither will you so we get the disability there. you may recall jon nash from movie a beautiful mind who also saw patterns that were not real, patterns of government coverups and conspi
CSPAN
Jul 2, 2011 6:00pm EDT
that slavery was the big difference between the two, but there were lots of other differences. one of them is that the southerners had pursued a very profitable intensive monoagriculture. maybe it was rice one place or tobacco another place. that was different, where there was much more of a mixed economy in the north. but i started to say about northern abolition--that had a tremendous ideological and social impact on the north and differentiated it from the south in a very conspicuous way, because now it wasn't just the paucity of slaves in the north, it was an actual moral stance having been taken against slavery. c-span: how many slaves were there in the north? >> guest: mm. goodness. that's a question i'm not prepared to answer. a quarter--let me give you some figures--a quarter of the working population in manhattan was enslaved. i know that. in the new england states, it was about 4 percent to 6 percent of the population. if--in pennsylvania, it might be 10 percent to 12 percent. new york: 16 percent, 18 percent. new jersey--about that. so... c-span: what was the impetus to get rid
CSPAN
Jul 11, 2011 7:00am EDT
, or it comes from the marketing department of a multibillion dollar organization that really has a big financial stake in the future of it's important to remember that books. if someone has a future that completely and 100% is tied up in e-books, they are going to tell you the future in the state of the book is all about e-books your now, in order to try to separate the rhetoric from the reality of simba information on with our parent company, we put together a nationally representative u.s. consumer survey. and we wanted to go to the entire u.s. adult population and basically ask who is buying these things anyway. do you buy e-books? what devices do you, on which do you read? how many books do you buy, and so forth. and over the three-year period we've been collecting this data, we've been collecting at quarterly for our e-book publishing 2011 report, we found about 90% of u.s. adult population hasn't bought a single solitary digital book. not a single e-book. we also found out because we asked questions that print book buyers still outnumber e-book buyers about five to one. and the o
CSPAN
Jul 17, 2011 12:15am EDT
of its reputation now. think of the vonnegut books and the books that were big in the '60s and '70s if you're old enough to have been around then. very different books now. malcolm muckeridge marshall mcclewin. i'm in the ms today. [laughter] cultural superstars then, and they don't show up now. so that's, i think, the first thing. the other thing is the biography of a person, you dig into letters, you dig into reminiscences and so on. here you have mainly a narrative of where it's gone, what's happened to it along the way. and it was such a delightful concept that when i met the other authors and like to tell them about who some of these authors are or what they're going to write about because that gives you a sense of where you can take this, the diversity that's been going on. >> the other two books that have already been published in the series, one is a biography of augustin's confession by gary wells who has, of course, written about augustin several times during his career. and then this is a biography of the tibetan book of the dead by donald lopez who's up at the university
CSPAN
Jul 25, 2011 1:00am EDT
with happiness. one was much smaller states than we ended up with. he believed a state was too big, it would end up containing people from too diverse groups, and would eventually crumble. he knew of what he was speaking because his state, virginia at the point in time included what is now virginia, kentucky and west virginia, and was not a happy state and in fact it leader broke up. kentucky was seated right around this time. west virginia not until the civil war. but the other thing jefferson was talking about was who controls the senate. all those maritime states the talked about, the darker green states on the map have rivers and waterways that flow to the atlantic. west of the appellation the waterways flow unless they go directly into the gulf, they ultimately find their way to the mississippi river. and at that point in time, the mississippi river was controlled by spain in what is now tennessee since it had not yet been a state they proclaim themselves a state without congress' approval, franklin, and they talked about proclaiming themselves a republic called franklin and opening negotia
CSPAN
Jul 24, 2011 1:00pm EDT
dream. he was a standard. he was a big star. he became the social leader of all the co-ops at the entrance and then he fell in love with a young intern, and we've all done something stupid out of love. what he did was he stole a 600-pound safe full of moon rocks from his professor's office, and as i said, spread them on the bed, had sex with his girlfriend and then try to sell them over the internet to a belgian gem dealer. >> his name was? >> axel. you couldn't have invented this guy. [laughter] this guy has never been out of antwerp is like. he collects rocks and treats them every monday night in issued center where all the guys in antwerp trade rocks. his hobby is popinjay which i had never heard of which is a sport where there's a wooden bird on a 100-foot pole and all these men stand around and shoot crossbows. this is a real sport. use this guy and he seized his hat on the internet, i've got moon rocks for sale, and he is this big believer in right and wrong sweetie immediately called the fbi. e-mail the fbi in tab and he became this big sting operation. thad robe
CSPAN
Jul 30, 2011 10:00pm EDT
. this is the end of 1802. jefferson is soon to be president, and hamilton writes to pinckney, pinckney's got a big plantation down here. and says, my dear sir: regarding, as you know, as a disappointed politician, this is hamilton saying he's going to retire from public life which, of course, he didn't do. but he's asking pinckney to send him seeds. he had just bought a new plantation house of his own in new york. he was going to plant a garden, set up shop and forget about politics. we all know how alexander hamilton wound up, maybe he would have been better if he'd just retired to his garden. a few other things from the collection, let's see, there's, um, john craigton's view of carolina. we've got a lot of things from the early colonies that are of national importance, but it is a charleston institution, it's a south carolina institution, so there are some great documents. this is the original manuscript copy, and you can see the shape it's in. we're absolutely open to conservation donations. this is the original manuscript copy of his view of carolina. he was one of the first governors of the
CSPAN
Jul 2, 2011 3:44pm EDT
in africa, big game hunting. and writing for an audience that was growing and growing, it was a very successful magazine. by the end of the 1930s he was appearing monthly in a magazine that had a readership of about a million men. so this is a period that helped to create that persona, that masculine persona where he was writing of himself for men about his adventures and it contributes to these apocryphal stories that are out there. >> before our next call we would like to you listen to ernest hemingway's voice. this is a little clip of him talking about the many places where he's written in his career. let's listen. >> beside the fifth column, i wrote the killers, today is friday, and indians, part of the sun also rises and the first third to have and to have not in matry. it was always a good place for working. so was paris and so were key west, florida, in the cool months. the ranch near koch city, montana, kansas city, chicago, toronto and havana, cuba. the first one i wrote was up in michigan. written in paris in 1921. the last was old man at the bridge, cabled from barcelona i
CSPAN
Jul 24, 2011 2:00pm EDT
's going to happen in denver. remind them of the big thompson flood or any time we have blizzards. people in florida during the hurricanes. despite the effort of florida power britney and crews from all over the country to turn the power back on, people and fun were still without power for six weeks. that's not bad today. think about august, september, in d.c. your apartment, your home, your condo, your office, or ever is, no power for six weeks. i don't want to be around you guys. you'll be nuts. you'll be irritable, pain in the rear, some of you might go off the deep end, start shooting or whenever. there is a very thin line between this technologically savvy society that we have today and mother nature or man either purposely or accidentally creating a crisis where everything we take for granted is gone. i'm afraid that most of us are deadly indifferent to it. we don't like to think about it. my time in d.c. and fema has made me a pervert in respect because now when i travel i think about how i get back, something happens. at think about we were in wholefoods are someplace. i'm looking
CSPAN
Jul 23, 2011 11:00pm EDT
to the astronaut training programs and he was achieving his dream. he is a big star and became the social leader with of the interns and then he fell in love with a young intern, and we've all done something stupid out of love. but thad roberts did is stole a safe of moon rocks from his professor's office, and as i said, spread them on a bed, had sex with his girlfriend and tried to sell them over the internet to a belgium gm dealer whose name was axle. you couldn't have invented this guy. he's never been out in his life, he's collecting rocks and treats them every monday night in this huge center where all the guys treat rocks. his hobby i have never heard of is a sport where there is a wooden bird on a 100-foot pole and all of these men stand around and shoot with crossbows. this is real. i never heard of it. so he sees this data on the internet, i've got moon rocks for sale, and he's a big believer in right and wrong so he immediately called the fbi, he mailed the fbi in tampa and it became a big testing operation and thad roberts was taken down -- i always give it away but you know he got ar
CSPAN
Jul 27, 2011 7:00am EDT
actually gets this pretty well. you guys all get this. you get 90% of people who think that big business has too much power in washington, d.c., in polls. 90% is an awesome number. 80% of the population thinks the earth revolves around the sun. think about it, right? okay. 90% is amazing. 70% of tea party self-five-day forecast tea party people think the united decision was wrong. so what we don't have is the way david people we don't have people against it and they are not mobilized. all we have against all this money is all of our collective people power. if you're passionate about climate change or you want safe water, you want safe food, you're worried about workers safety and you want to avoid another wall street collapse and you're worried about jobs issues and you want a fair education system and you want to bring down these outrageous for-profit colleges and do all that work but you got to do some work on the issue of campaign finance and overturning the citizens united decision. this is my first campus progress conference too but what i learned in my 90 minutes here or so is cam
CSPAN
Jul 18, 2011 1:00am EDT
of readers. meier paris wordpro with big readers. there were not sitting around the gain existentialist. i used to save my dad read by the pound. my mother love true crime would always be embarrassing riding the train reserve it is like the i 95 killer on the front cover there is a pitcher of 70 stabbing somebody but i was lucky. i ran into a friend from high school who said whenever i went over to your house your parents would be sitting in the living room reading no tv or radio and i thought that was so weird. [laughter] now he has kids of his own he could appreciate that was a good atmosphere to grow up and fostered by the above books. went to college at the university of philadelphia and graduated 1988 with the degree of folklore. any other folklore majors here today? [laughter] angling through the other occupations i have had i have chosen many non lucrative occupations including writings and non best-selling book but that one especially i remember looking at the want ads every sunday. it would have between forests and forklift operator. but i move to seattle and drifted into public r
CSPAN
Jul 17, 2011 9:00am EDT
it was no big deal. as she walked into the clinic something odd happened to another girl cautioned her and said all babies want to be born. james ignored or. what did this young woman no? your baby has a hard. jane in order again. your baby has fingernails. now, that was odd. this should occur. she walked into the abortion clinic and she sat down. she glanced around and she couldn't help but notice that everyone is playing with their fingernails. tapping them on the tables, chewing on them and she thought i have a life growing inside of me and she walked out of the abortion clinic and that was the end of the story. how many of you remember the statistic i gave you about a minute and a half ago? how many of you remember what prompted jane to walk out of the abortion clinic? everybody remembers the fingernails. and i promise you we cannot even those who your remembered the statistic, 1,466,000, those who remember the forgotten assist a six and would have remembered the finger nails. narratives matter. we have fought into the trap of thinking that intellectual argument tends to trump emotion. you
CSPAN
Jul 24, 2011 7:00pm EDT
was a stand out, big star, he came became the social leader of all of the co-op and interns. then he fell in love with young intern. we have all done something sometime out of love. he stole a 600 pound safe full of moon rocks from his professors office. as i said, spread them on the bed, had sex with his girlfriend, and try it had sell them over the internet to a belgium jim dealer, axel zimmerman. he's never been out, collecting rocks and trades them every monday night in the huge center where all of the guys in antwerp trade rocks. his hobby is a stick on a wooden bird and 100 foot pole and all of the men shoot at it with cross bows. this is the real sport. he seeing the add on the internet, i've got moon rocks for sale. he is the big believer in right and wrong. he called the fbi, he e-mailed the fbi. it became the big sting operation. thad roberts was taken down -- i always give it away. you know he got arrested. right. right. >> don't cross that line. >> right. >> you obviously have come off of enormous success with not only the books, but also the fact they then are converted to mo
CSPAN
Jul 9, 2011 6:00pm EDT
eyewitness account that plutarc relied upon. >> what do you know about julius ceasar as a person? how big was he? >> physically. >> he was a tall man. very attractive. he came from a very well-placed patrician family. but he sided with the popular party. he wanted reforms. he felt rome needed reformed. for rome to survive, those who had a lot had to give a little. and he wanted to reign in the self-enriching class. he pushed for land distribution, rent control, debt cancellation, luxury tax on the very rich. these are the things that they really disliked about him. he encouraged the development of guilds and unions. they weren't called unions, they were called guilds, of the common people so that they could have a presence. he bypassed the senate when he came back and took over. the government, he bypassed the senate and he, he sent things through the tribal asimplies. through the forum and the assemblies. >> what was his tight snell. >> his title by this time was empertor perpetual. excuse my latin. literally "emperor for life". >> how did he get that job? >> the word emperor wasn't it.
CSPAN
Jul 22, 2011 5:00pm EDT
big. i am sorry about the attention span of some members of congress but they could wait for the movie. maybe it will be coming forward. we are dealing with an interconnected system. there was a central theme. by sources of liquidity outside the banking system and increased information technology people in the financial industry have figured out a way to engage in lending while appearing to escape the burden of risk. they appeared to -- this didn't go away. accumulated elsewhere in the system and exploded on all of us. what we have done is basically make people be responsible for the risk and one important issue that are dealt with with some friends on the liberal side is a question of risk retention. i would urge people to look at michael lewis's book the big short. when people make loans and have no responsibility whether or not they are repaid they will not be as prudent. that is a market incentive. the alternative is oh no, the regulators will tell you what is good and what isn't. we are on the market side here. i don't want to depend on regulators to look at all of these loans. th
CSPAN
Jul 6, 2011 11:00pm EDT
court term began, two of the big lens or person in the cases come if you protest a chemist vendor versus phelps in the videogame case from which ended at being caught brown v. entertainment software association. both of those cases brought with them the chance to explore first amendment issues in the internet era and they ended up really not doing that at all. the funeral case had a component to it involving an online screed against their parents of corporal snyder, which the court completely declined to address it all and instead look at it as a type of dinner plates. the videogame case again had the potential of looking at whether this new medium has something different than the other new media that arose over the centuries, but instead decided it did not impose either unanimous word you unanimous holdings getting to that resold. we have as well i suppose we should be grateful for arizona's contribution to the supreme court docket with the tuition tax credit case in the clean elections case which was perhaps again i say the clean elections case the perhaps most predictable outcome, the
CSPAN
Jul 18, 2011 4:00am EDT
big a job for an individual to tackle plich. i mean, there's some very courageous people like yourself who would speak out against it like you did with the problems against the corvette, but you didn't add $200 million towards the advertising campaign. peter is right. to have the infrastructure to do that properly takes years. you need an advertising agency, and a lot of things that regular businessmen who look at the bottom line, investment bankers and so forth, are not qualified to do, and to put that together in a short period of time and carry it off really well is extremely difficult. i think the main problem is, you know, you know -- you say to yourself, gee, i'd like to do that, but i'm really afraid to do it because i'll look like a fool saying the president and the congress doesn't know what they're doing, and i know more, and i'm telling the american people what to do. most people are too humble about that. >> okay. let me be clearer. first of all, george was already against it. the protagonist you have to convince. >> he didn't spend $200 million though. >> i like george tre
CSPAN
Jul 6, 2011 9:00am EDT
in transforming themselves, she's one of the big reasons why. please help me in welcoming to the stage, liz schuller. [applause] >> thank you. all right. thank you, barry, for the introduction. and i'd like to think raj for raising the bar. thanks a lot for the rest of us and not those creative messaging tools that we all need to address inequality. i wish i would have heard her before my speech. so why am i here as part of this panel? the whole point of what i want to talk to you today is the power of collective action and how it could counter the rise in inequality and how unions fit into that picture. now, when i think about inequality, especially, as of late, i think about those teachers in wisconsin, construction workers in ohio, nurses in new hampshire, who have been locked out and denied their basic rights to collective bargaining. we've seen what it looks like the state capital in wisconsin and we show you now what's happening in office buildings all across this country. ♪ >> here's to america's workers. when the economy was down, they sacrificed. during tough times when executive
CSPAN
Jul 1, 2011 12:00pm EDT
. a big bank or two fail. this causes a run on american money market funds which have exposure of about a trillion dollars to european banks. and we find ourselves very quickly back at a moment very much like 2008. do you find a scenario like this to be plausible? and if so, what has dodd-frank accomplished? >> maybe i can start and others can join in. first of all, i think it's a terrific and i think central important question. i do think there is real risk right now, as there has been for many months now, that crisis in europe hurts the -- not just the european banking sector but the u.s. banking sector and the u.s. financial sector. the money market fund system is still, i think, not fully resolved. that is i think the sec's changes under rule 287 that improve the liquidity position of money market funds is good. the bazzel liquidity rules that will kick into place for the banking sector are good and will help. the capital margin and collateral requirements in the repo sector will also help significantly. and weaknesses -- i'm sorry, the last i would point out the significant capital
CSPAN
Jul 18, 2011 8:30am EDT
and a big part of this community. i was grateful to see him here today before i turn over to arianna who i think is an expert on journalism and editorial, i want to go through a few points of real big things that we're betting on as a company, not talk about aol but let's talk about the things we see in the future and why we're putting such an investment in journalism. number one question i get from wall street all the time is why journalism, why are you choosing when the rest of the world seems to be going away from journalism? why are you opening up a thousand patches? why did you buy the "huffington post"? and i think the things i'm about to talk about are a core essence of what we believe them. the first is really a bit of the human needs stage which is, if you woke up and today was your first day on planet earth, what would you knows and what would you see? i think there's some very stark things. one is there's four or 5 billion phones in peoples pockets and a lot of smart phone growth across the world, which means people are going to be connected full-time with information all the ti
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 8:30pm EDT
and virginia is the big exception to this because they are the ones as john pointed out that established religious freedom, separation of church and state and so forth. if you look at these stasis constitutions and i don't have a political ax to grind, but it fascinates me that almost all of them have very, very specific religious christian, if not protestant qualifications for holding office so you have pennsylvania, for example, the most radical democratic constitution of them all, and in order to serve the government in pennsylvania, you have to uphold the devine inspiration of the old and new testaments. you know, you have to believe in a god. vermont is the one i love. 177 # -- 1776 constitution of the independence of vermont, now this bashing of liberalism, upholds the idea all people serving in government must believe in the inspiration of the devine old and new testaments, obey the sabbath, and be a protestant, catholics, jews, forget about it. they can't serve in government. it's referred to as a federalist argument; right? at what -- did the constitution leave religion out beca
CSPAN
Jul 3, 2011 2:00am EDT
from cuba into key west was also a big part of the scene then. cuba itself was locked in revolution. there was a rit-wing military dictator in power. there was a growing communist revolt against him, so a lot of revolutionary activity, gun-running, very exciting time to be here in key west. so, he loved the fishing, he loved hispanic culture, he loved the real people here and kind of hard-boiled life that they led. dealing with these two cultures and the transitional period. >> in each one of these programs, we are focusing in on a particular work of the writer. in this one, we are dealing with ernest hemmingway's classic book "the sun also rises" and the modern library list of books at the end of the 20th century, this was number 45 of the most influential novels of the century. for him, which book was it? >> for hemmingway, it was his first novel. his very first book was a collection of short stories called "in our time" which absolutely was a ground-breaking book. one of the things we all need to remember about hemmingway is that in a sense he created american literary modernism
CSPAN
Jul 24, 2011 6:15pm EDT
in the house? >> or ailing west. so t . so the book is about identity. if you were to big -- give short answers? >> are have always been a loner and take deep pride ini have al and take deep pride in my cuban routes, always even when i was shellshocked. cubans would come to the house and the shellshocked because my parents were darker than i was. >> as opposed to? >> i had an irish great great grandfather named o'connor who emigrated to cuba on a ship in the 1820s and married a descendant named conception. i always wanted to write a book about conception o'connor. there are blunts and fair skinned people and relatives in my family and so forth but in my upbringing my brother's nickname was pinky but he spoke better spanish and use to get beat up by latinos and white guys. in the context of where i grew up which was new york in the 50s and 60s the race thing was pretty pronounced. last night i was in washington and ran into a puerto ricans woman who actually went to the same high school i did and she said you went there? how come you didn't get beat up all time? it was mostly black and latino. i
CSPAN
Jul 14, 2011 6:00am EDT
of the big problems we have which will last even beyond this recovery is the fact that we have millions of people have been out of work for six months or a year or more. we have millions of people who are insufficiently trained, you know, to work with new technologies and to compete on a global basis. let me be clear. i'm not just showed a government training program. there are many ways to help people get up to speed, you know, through technical schools or a whole variety of programs, but i do think that was the important things we need to do for our working people is to make sure they have the skills they need to get decent work. and those of skill requirements are only going to go up over time. >> i'm sorry. mr. miller. >> thank you. could you have your, mr. bernanke. enjoyed your testimony. i've agreed stability in the market place is having impact on the recovery. you also see people are not consuming because of the wealth of loss and housing sector and i think you're absolutely correct in that. that there's a lack of confidence in housing market today. mortgage refinance is have c
CSPAN
Jul 23, 2011 8:00am EDT
remains will help us get rid of too big to fail. >> thank you. ..y much >> and what do you do with your stolen moon rocks? don't try to sell them on the internet. ben mezrich on someone who tried. sign up for booktv alert, weekend schedules in your inbox. >> next, a panel from the 2011 los angeles times festival of books titled american history: blood and back rooms. it's about an hour. >> well, first, i just want to thank you all for coming on this beautiful day to talk about american history.- it's so great to see so many his people interested, and i'm getting a heads up that i'm not being heard in the back. is it too -- i don't have a really loud voice. is that better? closer, closer? oh, i'm going to --t >> [inaudible] >> okay.er how's that? i'm not used to this. i'm from montana.hat? we don't have microphones. u [laughter] any excuse you can find. i am from montana. any excuse you can find. we know that we are not supposed to have our cellphone on. we would appreciate it if you would turn that off. no person or recordings allow. appreciate if you would follow that. how you like to
CSPAN
Jul 17, 2011 10:00am EDT
-30 years ago and think of its reputation now. think of the books that were big in the 60s and 70s, if you're old enough to have been around then, they are very different books now. herbert and marshall and the coastal superstars then, and they don't show up now. that's, i think, the first thing. the other thing is biography of a person, you dig into letters. you dig into rem innocences and -- rem remanents and so on. this was just a delightful concept when i met the other authors and they told me about who the authors are and what they write about. that gives you a sense where to take this diversity of what's going on. >> so the other two books already published in this series, one is a biography of a confession by gary wills who has, of course, wrote about this several times during his career, and then this is a biography of the book of the dead by donald lopez up at the university of michigan. each of them treats this idea in each of the three in a different way, and still and some of the books that are still to come in this series also promise to be very interesting, and vie -- vanessa
CSPAN
Jul 24, 2011 11:00pm EDT
back in. even a with a big bank account there is an end to it. that's pretty much what is happening. when i pressed the depletion question, he shrugged and said look, they recharge 5% a year with rainwater to read others claim texas portion of the aquifer is much less one tent for%. i get pumped down to 50% but not hurt anybody. we will never punted try and why would i? i live there. i've got about 100 million invested in my property. it's even got a golf course and flashed a quick grin. this is a forever supply of water. mesa will require the rights to sell between 200 to 320 acre-feet of water per year which is enough to supply 1 million to 1.5 million texans. the panhandle counties roberts, and ogletree that would take part in such a deal set over 81 million of the water. as pickens sees it, water is like any other resource. it's a commodity just like a wheel that should be prospect and sold for profit. i don't think you should cut people off from the water. everyone deserves a bite of the apple. it will provide us with a secure drought source for the future. in the summer of 200
CSPAN
Jul 12, 2011 9:00am EDT
in touch with mr. watson but not mr. bryant's big and presenting your committee, "the guardian" or anyone else? >> anyone who is holding material, which clearly people are, from the amounts of media coverage, and there's been some species are you surprised any of these names that are coming out, or do know these names? for example, the gordon brown issue. >> now, i am aware of them. >> mark reckless. [inaudible] holding material because of the stories coming out, is at least another theoretical possibility as stores are being sourced from within the metropolitan police? >> i'm sorry, i don't follow your. >> could it not be the opposite, whether paid or otherwise information, rather than necessary being the place that the media outlets already have it? [inaudible] >> well, we always, we will always be accused of that. i can say with absolute confidence, because i know what's been there. for instance, when there was speculation around victims of 77 bombings, we did not know that they were contained within our material. >> thank you for the answer that i wasn't accusing. >> is a natural thin
CSPAN
Jul 31, 2011 1:00pm EDT
. the court refused to hear the case in 2005 and left miller in jail. that was a big story because everybody had anticipated that the court would clarify and needed to clarify the extent to which reporters are able to protect their confidential sources. but in the miller case it was a disi ponte -- disappointing nondecision, just a refusal to take the case. the only case that the court has ever decided on this issue was another one that i worked on the losing side of, and that was back in 1972 and involved earl caldwell, a reporter for "the new york times" who covered the black panther party. and did all the times' coverage of the black panther or party. the court in the caldwell case decided that reporters had to appear before a grand jury who were investigating something about the, about the black an they are party -- panther party, and the reporters had to testify like any other citizen would have to testify. and reporters had no first amendment protection against compelled disclosure of their sources. even if that meant that the sources would dry up, not cooperate, and that would ruin a
CSPAN
Jul 22, 2011 12:00pm EDT
and making us a better nation? let me introduce to you another dreamer. this is jose migana. a big smile on his face. jose brought to the united states from mexico when he was two years old. he grew up in arizona. he graduated as the valedictorian of his high school class. he enrolled in arizona state university, became the first member of his family to attend college. but then arizona passed a law prohibiting public universities from giving financial aid or in-state tuition rates to undocumented students. hundreds of students were forced to drop out of school. but jose persevered. he found his calling on the speech and debate team where he ranked fifth in the nation. and in 2008, jose migana graduated summa cum laude from arizona state university with a major in business management. jose couldn't work because of his legal status so he went to law school. next year, jose will graduate from baylor university law school in waco, texas. despite his potential to give to this country, jose will not be able to work as a lawyer because of his undocumented status. he sent me a letter and here's
CSPAN
Jul 2, 2011 10:00pm EDT
is still doing this? >> guest: this is the big shift. one engineer told me they collect 57 different variables about people who even if you're not locked in if you take a new laptop and put it on the desk right here you can tell what kind of laptop is it, what kind of software, the size of the font on the laptop where is it located and how long are you lingering before you click on the link. in all these things can be used to make guesses of what kind of person you are, there's big font and small font people, and all of this then allows you to make these guesses. this may not be a very good portrait of you don't need that much in order to be able to do this with an increase in optimization and talk to the folks at hunch, they got in personalization site and they say actually you need very little data in order to start to have a lot of predictive power five data points, five particular data points you can then get any other data point within acres it accuracy if. >> host: what would they need to know about me to make these predictions? >> guest: . >> i can remember about four of them,
CSPAN
Jul 16, 2011 4:00pm EDT
is his newest book, "warfare state" world war ii americans and the age of big government. .. remove a cancerous tumor from presidents grover cleveland in june 1893 during 1 of the worst economic moments in american history. mr. matthew algeo talks about his book with an audience at the american -- the museum of american finance in new york city. it's about 55 minutes. >> hi, i'm david cowen, president of the museum of american finance. bagram. welcome back to our lunch and learn series. welcome to the university of oklahoma. the okies are in the house. thank you for coming. please join us again, everyone, next week on the 26. we will continue the lunch and learn series the director of the rothschild art -- archive. again, one week from this thursday. on the 204th, tuesday, we will be streaming the rediscovering alexander hamilton. this is the pbs documentary that was recently released. all your questions about the movie can be answered because the producer, director will be in the house. now, turning your attention to today and matthew algeo and "the president is a sick man." this
CSPAN
Jul 17, 2011 2:00pm EDT
, you know, she was very influential and a big name in the islamic world as was her adopted father, so i felt like these issues, you know, and i was, you know, writing and researching this book in the midst, you know, the war on terror, and also in new york city where, you know, i had, you know -- you know, witnessed the 9/11 attacks, you know in 2001, so i was torn -- the idea of objectivity really never entered into it because on the one hand i had been traumatized deeply and personally effected by the 9/11 attacks, but on the other hand, i've seen this country that i loved, you know, become this sort of, you know, you know, betray its most sort of sacred laws in pursuit of, you know, a war against, you know, muslim people that really had nothing to do with the attacks, so i was -- you know, the deeper i got into her life and into this story, the more it became apparent there were these elephants in the room i just couldn't pretend with respect there. those are the long answers to your questions. >> it's a great answer, and it seems that both for you and for margaret markus, the book i
CSPAN
Jul 24, 2011 8:45am EDT
to a big question, but it's a big question that i've been struggling to figure out how to ask. there's a tangle of conflicting thoughts in my mind relating to the specific moments of april 12th and april 13th, 1861. and they're tangled by some more general thoughts about the clauses of the civil war and tangled further by my recollections of my own inadequacies of the teacher of the american history survey course at the university of pennsylvania where most of my career there. i should confess that unlike most of the people who teach the first half of the american history survey course, i actually end the course with a firing on fort sumter. .. >> and that the north was very reluctantly, halfheartedly respond to that challenge. it's not a conflict that they wished to have. your interpretation is not wholly at odds with that, but you do see northerners even at the moment of fort sumter as not merely occupying and attentive posture. but as standing up in an affirmative way for things in which they sincerely believed. i wonder if you could talk a little bit about your sense of what nort
CSPAN
Jul 18, 2011 11:00pm EDT
for the agency and mr. frumkin has been a big part of the efforts to make progress on this issue. and finally, jennifer you'll who has been with the agency for 18 years. she is a doctorate in nuclear engineering from m.i.t. and in fact the nrc health provider the opportunity to pursue the study's. right now she helps makes decisions on where the nrc spends its research money, to best advance the science and nuclear safety. most recently she was part of a 24/7 operation center team during the japan crisis and because of her expertise she was asked to serve on the international atomic energy agency fact-finding mission to japan. these three outstanding and perfection of their representatives of the thousands of individuals who work day in and day out to make sure we meet our responsibilities for nuclear safety to the public. now i'm sure the recent events in japan in their implications for how we approach nuclear safety in this country are foremost in everyone's minds. since the events began to unfold four months ago, the nrc has taken strong and immediate actions to ensure the continued safety
CSPAN
Jul 18, 2011 8:30pm EDT
, south carolina, utah and i am leaving out north carolina and illinois because those are the big jackpot states with a really driving party potential for gain. than i have a question mark as far as which party is going to gain a seat or lose a seat and it could be a fair fight in states like iowa, new jersey and arizona are go but i'm sure the five states we'll be talking a lot about this morning and i will stop short in going on depth in this are illinois and north carolina which are opportunities for partisan capitalization on this redistricting. illinois for democrats picking up potential a five or six seats or four or five seats republicans losing five or six and illinois. north carolina where i put republican gains have possibly three seats be the -- depending on the legal challenge to the mass republicans are proposing and then california where he think democrats at the end of the day will probably pick up two or three seats as a result of the entangling of california's uncompetitive line at the moment. texas where i expect republicans netting two seats depending on the legal chall
CSPAN
Jul 27, 2011 9:00am EDT
while i appreciate your reassurance, it's somewhat like you said, mr. gruenberg, about the too big to fail in response to mr. corker. we're waiting for the evidence that something is different in regard to those community banks. and so in particular, i want to -- and i certainly agree with you that the fdic insurance issues that you raise, i think are a positive development. but let me particularly raise with you the disparate treatment of capital standards between community banks and large financial institutions. the definition of well capitalized seems to have a different definition in regard to whether or not you're a large or small bank. and many of our community banks are being regulated in which they are required to have a much higher percentage of capital than our smaller banks -- i'm sorry, than our larger banks many of which those larger banks are under regulatory restrictions as a result of their financial condition. so my point is there's a double standard in my view between the capital requirements that small banks, community banks are required to have and that of large
CSPAN
Jul 31, 2011 5:00pm EDT
that came to me was, why was this big event, this -- i thought turning point. why was it always sort of margin liesed? >> and one night, tom and i were at a writer's party in georgetown. and we both lived in montgomery county. so i didn't have a ride home from the party, and i hardly knew tom at that point. so i said, can i get a ride home? and tom said, sure. and by the time the door opened at my house, tom and i were partners on this thing. and that was three, over three years ago. we did three years of rather intense research. and i think the best way to sort of illustrate sort of a preamable. if you took a map of america and you went from maine, in this corner, to los angeles, in this corner, from portland, oregon in this corner, to the florida keys, those were the extent of the places we went. and we probably hit 25 major research institutions in between. we literally left no stone unturned. and i think the one of the things we had to deal with, and one of the things we had to to come to grips with, is why this has always been an episode, a moment, a little blip. no more signifi
CSPAN
Jul 7, 2011 9:00am EDT
a to b. >> vikrum? >> i think a big part of it is that you need to understand that social change, we don't wake up overnight and think like i'm going to change the world. just like you said that you want, or that you make this for any particular in other than for a class project. you have to realize even if you have, dream big torture. i'm sure, i didn't mean to don't wake up and think that you can't save the world. but know that that's not going to happen overnight. social change doesn't come overnight, but it does come and commitment. even by having good dialogues like this today. i know that sounds cheesy but think that's the first step because when you get those first job, i can only speak about kind of washington oriented jobs, but you might have tried we can best universities were really been the top of your class or feel that you are really, have a high aptitude and i grasp of issues but when you get there, you might feel downtrodden and say why am i not talking to the press right now about why we need a cap-and-trade legislation. realize that the change will come incrementally, b
CSPAN
Jul 10, 2011 12:00pm EDT
account, even if i'm not logged in as a g-mail user? google is still doing this? >> guest: this is the big shift. google, one engineer told me they collect 57 different variables about people who even if you're not logged in, if you take a new laptop and put it on the desk right here, you can tell what kind of laptop is it, what kind of software is it running, what is the size of the fonts on this laptop, where is it located? what's the ip address? how long are you lingering before you click on a link? and all of these things can be used to make some guesses about what kind of person you are. there's mac and pc people, big font and small font people. all of this, then, allows you to make these guesses. they may not be, i mean, this may not be a very good portrait of you. it almost certainly isn't at that point. but you don't need that much in order to be able to do this with an increase in on the many iization. and -- opt myization. i talked to the people at hunch, and, you know, they said actually you need very little data in order to start to have a lot of predictive power. so five data
CSPAN
Jul 5, 2011 8:00pm EDT
, and i would say let's go back to basics. when you have a big problem, you go back to the basics where you have to start to solve a problem, and the basics are a budget. if we can agree on a budget, and, heck, i think we all agree that if we get one on the floor, there's going to be a lot of amendments. there's going to be a lot of amendments to a budget resolution. let's get started. let's use this week to produce a budget resolution, and let's start having the amendments about spending levels, about spending priority. that will be a way that we can start the process of determining if we can, in fact, lift the debt ceiling because there are significant cuts in the spending in this country that would show the rest of the world that is holding our debt as well as the american people who are living with this government and holding part of the debt that we're serious, that we are going to get our financial house in order, and we're going to do it with a budget resolution that cuts spending and sets priorities like every family and every business in this country are required to do, and mos
CSPAN
Jul 4, 2011 8:30am EDT
state constitutions, and virginia is the big exception to this because they're the ones, as john just pointed out, established religious freedom, separation of church and state and so forth. if you look at these state constitutions, though, and, you know, i don't have a political axe to grind on this question, but it does fascinate me that almost all of them have very, very specific religious, christian if not protestant qualifications for holding office. so you have pennsylvania, for example. the most radical, democratic constitution of them all. in order to serve the government in pennsylvania, you have to uphold the divine inspiration of the old and new testaments. you know, you have to believe in a god. vermont is the one i love. 177 -- as a historian at least, right? 1776 constitution of the independent state of vermont, you know, today this bastion of kind of secular liberalism upholds the idea that, you know, all people serving in government must believe in the inspiration of -- divine inspiration of the old and new testaments, obey the soundness and be a protestant. so you've
CSPAN
Jul 23, 2011 3:55pm EDT
] dan charnas is here and he is the author of "the big payback," the history of the business of hip-hop. he is a journalist, screenwriter, record producer and teacher, one of the first writers for the source and part of the generation of young writers who helped create hip-hop journalism. give him a hand. [applause] and lastly mark johnson is here. he is the author of "basketball slave," the andy johnson harlem globetrotters mba story and that is quite a a title msa. mark johnson is the youngest son of andy johnson, a respected business professional and advocate for young people. he is a native of philadelphia and graduate of the university of new york at old westbury. "basketball slave" is filled with extraordinary tales about the story you never heard about the harlem globetrotters. he is going to tell us from the perspective of his father. give him a hand. [applause] okay let's start with dr. carla peterson. it has been said that your book, "black gotham," challenges many of the so-called truths about african-american history. expand on that. >> okay, so i wrote my book for the g
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